LRG records in Ensembl: stable annotation of human genes

LRG records in Ensembl: stable annotation of human genes

Why did my gene change? As a member of the Ensembl Outreach team, who is actively involved with training and user support, I often have to answer the question, “Why did the annotation of my favourite gene change?” There are Continue reading

Ensembl workshop at the Avian Model Systems meeting

Ensembl workshop at the Avian Model Systems meeting

The Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory will be hosting a winter conference on Avian Model Systems in March this year, and the abstract deadline is fast approaching. Prior to the meeting, the EMBL-EBI and the WTSI will run a two-day workshop Continue reading

Computing Ensembl’s New Regulatory Annotation

Computing Ensembl's New Regulatory Annotation

We described in a previous post Ensembl’s new regulatory annotation of the genome. Now, we will go in greater detail into how we computed it. We started by running ChromHMM over 17 cell types, using publicly available ENCODE and Roadmap Continue reading

The New Ensembl Regulatory Annotation

The New Ensembl Regulatory Annotation

GWAS after GWAS return statistically significant hits that are hard to interpret because they fall outside of coding regions, and this begs for more functional annotation of regulatory regions. We at Ensembl have been providing such an annotation for a Continue reading

WiggleTools: a pocket calculator for very large datasets

WiggleTools: a pocket calculator for very large datasets

We are pleased to announce a new bioinformatics application, WiggleTools, described in a recent Application Note in Bioinformatics. It allows you to quickly and conveniently compute statistics across many (up to the hundreds) of genome-wide datasets. WiggleTools is first a data summary tool. It collapses Continue reading

Ensembl Genomes release 21 is out!

We have just released the latest update of Ensembl Genomes. This release contains the chromosome survey sequence for bread wheat cv Chinese Spring, generated by the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium. More than 100,000 protein-coding genes predicted by MIPS  are now available for Continue reading